#AcresOfInk Writing Challenge ~ Week 24: Question 19 & 20

I’m so behind… I’m so behind.

As alluded to in my last post, I’ve been extremely busy both inside work and outside of it; it’s taken up all of my brain space. Nevertheless, I am determined to post this week even if it is short, so here we go…

Part of the 52 Week Writing Challenge. Click here to view all questions.

19. Which character is most likely to survive an apocalypse?

I actually think all four of my main characters would fare well quite well in an apocalypse situation. Over the course of The Mayor, Melora, Jaspher, Kale and John have all at some point experienced drastic, life-altering changes — a complete upheaval of their everyday existence — and yet manage to come out the other side alive… Great practise for an apocalypse situation! And if they teamed up and took on the end of the world together, there’d be absolutely no stopping them.

Here’s how I imagine it would go down in my head: John would rally the troops and lead a team of highly trained recruits to take on the zombie hoard; Melora would scrap and scrimp and sneak her way around our evil robot overlords, learning their weaknesses and taking them down from within; Kale would be completely immune to the killer bioweapon gone wrong spreading across the Taro Isles — likely because he caused it — remaining one step ahead of everyone else at all times; and Jaspher–

OK. Jaspher likely wouldn’t survive the apocalypse, but he’d do his absolute damnedest to ensure everyone around him was fed, watered and safe, and later sacrifice himself to save the Chosen Child i.e. the salvation of all humanity!

Or something to that effect.

20. Tell us about… religion in your book

As I mentioned in a previous post (here), religion is an aspect of my world building I consider to be significantly underdeveloped at present.

When I first started writing The Mayor, my characters made references to gods’ names I made up, but I stopped using them because I didn’t like them. To keep the first draft flowing, I let characters say things like, “By God!” and, “for God’s sake!”, but Christianity does not exist in my world, so this is a Problem.

I’m determined to straighten the theology of my world out during The Mayor‘s second draft.

S.E. Berrow

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Milestones, Novellas and Ravens

Hello, Everyone! I imagine you were probably expecting another month’s worth of answers to the #AcresofInk Writing Challenge.

Surprise! It’s not… Sorry about that.

I confess I’ve been rather amiss with my blogging of late. It’s my aim to catch up eventually, but these last couple of months have been an absolute whirlwind of activity and, much to my chagrin, June looks even worse. So, without further ado…

I’m just stopping by the officially announce…

~*~ I FINISHED THE FIRST DRAFT OF THE MAYOR ~*~

Huzzah

Huzzah! Huzzah! Huzzah!

Yes my friends, it has been A Struggle. After many, many years of trials, tribulations and tears, I finally have done it. I have written A Book. I’m so, so happy.

So what’s next?

Well, for the time being, I’ve put myself on an Enforced Break, fully endorsed by my writing partner K.F. Goodacre. This means I’m not even looking at my novel and actively trying not to think about it… which is much harder than it sounds. In the meantime, K.F. Goodacre has taken my book off my hands and is going to spend the next two months doing an initial edit for me. What a brave soul she is…

RavensTo distract myself, I’ve been catching up on some TV (Black Sails anyone?), reading 18th century books that aren’t mine (The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue by Mackenzie Lee) and keeping myself away from computer screens as much as possible. A couple of weekends ago my work colleague and friend from Latvia visited, and we went to the Tower of London to see the ravens ♥ This weekend just gone, I pampered myself with various lotions and potions (‘Drops Of Light’ facial peel from The Body Shop), enjoyed the warm weather and spent quality time with my boyfriend and his family. Self-care and socialising was something I seriously neglected during the months of March and April, so it feels good to be connecting with myself and the world again.

I’ve also started outlining a novella about my character, Jonathan Carson, which I’m hoping will inform my writing for Book 2 and also serve as a nice way to blow off steam when I eventually get round to editing my book. It is an absolute monster of a novel, standing at well over 200,000 words. I need to get it down to somewhere between 100,000 and 150,000 plus sort out the worldbuilding, plus tighten up the plot, plus build on certain characters, plus cut others completely, plus

What was that? Oh yes, sorry, I’m not meant to be thinking about this stuff at the moment.

Until next time, Lovelies x

Take care,

S.E. Berrow

#AcresOfInk Writing Challenge ~ Week 18: Questions 16, 17 & 18

Part of the 52 Week Writing Challenge. Click here to view all questions.

16. Your thoughts on… how to get the words down

There really is only one answer to this, and it’s the one no writer — wannabe, professional or otherwise — wants to hear:

Write.

Sit up at your desk, turn on your computer, open that document and write.

Grab a notebook, pull it over your lap, put the pen to the paper and write.

Grab your phone, turn it on, open that notepad app and write.

Most writers have day jobs, especially — but not limited to —those who aren’t published yet. The last thing we want to do when we get home from work is to sit back in front of the computer screen and do more work. I don’t have the time! you’ll hear us cry. I’m too busy! Too tired! I’m not in the mood! I don’t know what’s going to happen next! I’m not inspired!

Sadly, no amount of excuses is going to change this sad and sorry fact:

Writing is a verb. You can only achieve it by doing it.

Uninterrupted writing sessions are great, but they’re also super rare. I can’t afford to sit and wait for time to materialise (there are always cats to feed, meals to cook, clothes to wash etc.) so I have to carve time out for myself. I kid you not, I have legitimately produced approximately 100,000 words over the course of a single year just by forcing myself to write for at least half an hour every evening — not even every evening, just whenever I can. Sometimes that means going to bed a bit later than I’d like, or waiting to catch up on a favourite TV show. If I’m getting the words down and progressing through my story, then I’m one step closer to achieving my dreams. That makes it all worth it.

Terry Pratchett wrote whole books this way, forcing himself to write 400 words every day before he went to bed. I prefer to work by time rather than word count because I’m super slow, but whatever works for you.

At the same time it’s important to take days off when you burn yourself out. If the well runs dry to the point you actually hate your book and you are mere seconds away from pressing the delete button (been there, totally guilty)… take a break! Go for a walk. Watch some TV. Play a video game. Just make sure you do eventually go back to your book and continue from where you left off. Everything makes so much more sense after you’ve taken some time to recharge and refill your creative well.

17. Unseen Footage: Write a short scene that fits into your book but won’t make the final cut

The following scene is the opening of my planned John novella — something I want to write upon completion of The Mayor when I hand it over to K.F. Goodacre for preliminary editing and take a bit of a break. Though events that take place within this novella are key to the formation of John’s character (and thus important for me to know as a writer), it is not my intention to submit it for publication. Enjoy!

The pirates corralled John and the rest of the crew into a shivering, bloody huddle on the main deck, forcing them to their knees and trailing guns against their heads. Some, like John, had their hands bound behind their backs. Others less fortunate — men too wounded, weak or dazed to stand and fight — the pirates seemed content to let well alone. Where on earth would they go, surrounded and outnumbered as they were? The wooden planks of the deck were slippery and wet, scarlet and sodden with blood.

It took John a few moments to realise the insistent rhythmic clattering in his head was the sound of his own teeth. Chattering and shivering from the cold settling over his bones, he tugged  at his bonds and quailed at the sight of so many strangers — so many pitiless, colourfully-dressed men leering and jeering over the railings. One of the pirates made a show of tugging the rings off a dismembered, bloody hand, laughing as he threw it back at the original owner’s head, whose face had turned the colour of bilge water. Dark shadows bruised the skin beneath the man’s fever-bright eyes. John had no doubt the man would be dead within hours.

“Enough!” bellowed a voice from the quarterdeck, and immediately the pirates fell into ominous silence.

John’s bowels turned to water as the captain descended the stairs and appeared directly in front of him. Beetle-black eyes deep-set in a scarred and leathery face narrowed to pin-pricks, scrutinising his prize.

“Good afternoon, Gentlemen,” he grinned, baring an array of multicoloured teeth, few of which John imagined to be his own. “My name is Captain Rourke Marks of the Hoopoe, which is this rather fine looking vessel you see lashed to the side of your skiff here. Pray tell, which one of you gentlemen calls himself Captain? We have matters of great importance to discuss he and I, and I’ve no wish to dally. I’m afraid I’m in rather a hurry…”

John scrambled sideways as Marks reached down and grabbed one of his fellow sailors, hauling the man up by the scruff of the neck in front of the prize-crew and pressing a pistol to the back of his head.

“Three… two… one.”

Everyone jumped as the gun exploded, fresh blood and brains spraying all over the deck. John watched, horrified as the sailor crumpled to his knees, a ragged gaping wound where his eye had been. As the dead man’s body slumped sideways, Marks reached forward for another victim, and though he too struggled and protested, the pirate held him up before the crowd as though he were no more than a sack of potatoes. Drawing a second loaded pistol from his belt — John counted six in total — he pressed the barrel against the man’s brow and grinned that wicked grin.

“Three… two…one.”

Another explosion. More blood sprayed across the deck, and John flinched as this time some of it splashed across his face, hot and staining the corner his vision red. When Marks reached for him and near-yanked his arm out of its socket, he felt a sense of unreality sweep over, as though he’d stepped outside of his own body, watching everything unfold from a distance. He became aware of every sound and sensation; the broad expanse of the the pirate’s barrel chest against his back, the rotten-meat on his breath—

The cold metal promise of a gun pressed against his head.

“Three… two….”

“Wait!”

Every hair along the back of John’s neck rose as he felt Marks let out a breath of satisfaction behind his ear. His eyes widened at the sight of Reed pushing himself awkwardly to his feet, struggling under the weight of his leg, which was bloody and shaking, the material of his breeches soaked through from the slash of an errant pirate sword.

John gasped as Marks kicked out the back of his legs, taking all the weight off his feet. He hung limp at the pirate’s side, that iron-grip upon the crook of his arm not budging a single inch. Lowering the pistol, Marks kept it cocked, finger resting on the trigger.

“How nice of you to speak up, Captain…?”

“Reed, Sir. Hogarth Reed. Of the Mystic Rosa.”

“The Mystic Rosa? What the hell kind of shit name is that?”

“Well it weren’t me that named her—”

“Oh, nevermind, nevermind. The keys, Reed. Where are they? I seen what you’re carrying in your ledgers.”

“Keys? Keys to wh—?”

“To the cargo hold, you cretin, where else? Why? Do you think I meant keys to your God damned heart?”

“No, of course not, I—”

“Well? Speak up then! Quickly, quickly, I ain’t got all day.”

When Reed continued to hesitate, Marks growled, firing a single shot in the other captain’s direction, causing the him to yelp and throw his arms up above his head. The bullet ricocheted off the mast, narrowly missing a member of Marks’ own crew. One of the pirates up on the forecastle laughed.

Marks hauled John back up to his feet who struggled as he did so, shrinking away from the pirate’s foul breath, dizzy with the fear and stink of it. He froze as once again he felt the muzzle of a fourth gun against his temple, knowing it was all but a  hair’s breadth away from going off in the pirate’s hand if he so much as moved an inch.

“Next time, Captain Reed, I won’t miss. Now. Tell me. Where’re the God damned keys?”

~ ‘Rourke Marks’, extract from Untitled Novella (Copyright © S.E. Berrow 2018)

18. Your writing habits

I’ve answered this question before in a previous challenge (click here to view). Not much has changed, except I now write in my parents’ study instead of my own (because I moved out of my flat).

I also now make use of the wonderful Forest app to track my output. Instead of simply timing 30 minute time slots on my phone, I grow trees instead, where each tree represents 30 minutes of uninterrupted time — the tree dies if you leave the Forest app i.e. if you check or use your phone! It’s a good way of eliminating distractions. Sadly it won’t stop cats from walking all over your keyboard…

S.E. Berrow

#AcresOfInk Writing Challenge ~ Week 17: Questions 14 & 15

Catching up with this challenge slowly but surely…

Part of the 52 Week Writing Challenge. Click here to view all questions.

14. What (if anything) would you like to express through your writing?

It’s hard for me to explain what I’m trying to achieve through my writing when I don’t rightly know myself. I’m not actively trying to get a particular message across; I just want people to get swept up in my story and grow to love and loathe my characters in equal measure, hopefully enjoying themselves in the process.

Of course, it’s nigh on impossible to write completely objectively; my own thoughts, experiences and opinions are inevitably going to bleed into the pages somehow… I’m not comfortable with explicitly stating what these are. It’s much more fun for my readers to guess, or better yet, relate to it themselves without me forcing it down their throats.

Mostly, I just want to tell these characters’ stories so they’ll bloody go away and let me sleep!!!

15. Recipes in your book

I’ve spoken before (see here) about how my protagonist Melora absolutely loves ginger-nut biscuits and how I use them as a narrative tool.

In that vein, below is an 18th century gingerbread recipe taken from A New and Easy Method of Cookery by Elizabeth Cleland, 1755:

To make Ginger-bread.
TAKE half a Peck of Flour well dried, five Pounds of Treacle, half a Pound of Butter, two Ounces of beaten Ginger, an Ounce of Carraway Seed; boil the Treacle and Butter together, then mix it with the Flour and Seeds; You may put candied Orange, or Lemon-peel in it; If you please put three Eggs in it, bake them in little Cakes of butter’d Papers.

Simple, non?

If you can’t be bothered to bake but still want a taste of the past, there’s an English company called The Copper Pot who make and sell foodstuffs based on historical recipes (I can attest to their deliciousness). As far as the 18th century goes, they sell Hot Chocolate, Curry SpicesPink(!) Pancakes and, you guessed it, Gingerbread!

They even sell a herbal mix for you to enjoy a luxurious footbath, 18th century style. Enjoy!

S.E. Berrow

#AcresOfInk Writing Challenge ~ Week 16: Question 13

YES, I KNOW I’M BEHIND. I’M SORRY.

This question’s answer is kind of a long one so though so… that kinda makes up for it, I guess…?

Part of the 52 Week Writing Challenge. Click here to view all questions.

13. Your book is now a film. What will work well? What won’t?

Authors notoriously have little power when it comes to adaptions of their books. Cassandra Clare, for example, is occasionally forced to explain how she has absolutely noting to do with the (IMO) terrible adaptions of her work, and I’ve heard some real horror stories from people inside the industry about writers signing away their film rights without financial reimbursement (Cecily von Ziegesar, author of Gossip Girl; L.J. Smith, author of the Vampire Diaries… the latter doesn’t even own the rights to her own book series). As such, I shall begin this blog post with a public service announcement:

Should you ever be lucky enough to get a book signed for publication, take a lawyer in with you when you sign the contract!

Now that’s out of the way…

One of my Beta readers  remarked they could envision The Mayor as a BBC drama quite easily. At its heart The Mayor is essentially an 18th century period drama played out in a fantasy equivalent of the West Indies. Small, seemingly inconsequential actions have a tendency to ripple outwards to large and devastating effect, with a heavy emphasis on political dialogue and interpersonal relationships. That kind of story always works much better on the small screen than in the cinema, and although Part Two abandons the claustrophobic confines of New Hardway in favour of adventure on the high seas, I imagine the small screen is probably where The Mayor would end up should anyone be mad enough to try and adapt it.

So, what do I think would work well?

Costume

Blue CoatBeing an 18th century period drama — one of the prettiest and most extravagant eras in terms of European fashion — there’d be lots of opportunity for lavish, colourful costumes. Hair and make-up would have an absolute field-day with my protagonist Melora’s ringlets, and I’d love to see what wardrobe could produce for my villain’s beautiful blue coat.

My characters also encounter other cultures as they travel further up the map which might be fun to play with, such as the Kintaronese who favour light, loose clothing — shifts and kaftans, made from linen in rich turquoise blues — and adorn themselves with vast arrays of gold-plated jewellery (gold is considered common in Kintaro and thus even the poor dress themselves in this way; they even make their fishing hooks from it!).

Mise En Scene

I have written New Hardway is an aesthetically European town situated in a fantastical West Indies-equivalent known as the Taro Isles. A tropical coastline peppered with rainforests and tortugas, the bright and colourful Taro Isles would stand in direct contrast to New Hardway’s grand and austere architecture. There’s opportunity also to make it look the flora and fauna appear even more fantastical through the use of models or CGI, or both. Then there’s the tall ships, the shipping yard, the marketplace… I can see it all now…

Port Royal

Set pieces

As mentioned above, there’s quite a bit of swashbuckling in Part Two of The Mayor with naval battles, piratical pursuits and life-threatening storms… all of which I imagine would look pretty spectacular on the silver screen. Given even television’s dramatic improvement in recent years (see Game of Thrones, Outlander, Black Sails etc.), I imagine it’d look pretty good on the small screen too.

Sea battle

What won’t work well?

Sexual Content

I’d be very concerned with how TV/film might treat some of the sexual aspects of my book, particularly when it comes to sexual assault. Neither TV nor film have a particularly good history when it comes to depicting such things on screen (especially within an historical or fantastical context, of which my book is both), opting for soft-lightning, inexplicable titillation and absolutely zero consideration for the aftermath such a traumatic event might have. I’d want the filmmakers to give this subject some serious consideration and treat it with the sensitivity it deserves. If that means a fade to black or panning away from the whole thing completely, I’d really rather that than whatever the hell HBO did to poor Daenarys Targaryen (Game of Thrones) and Lucrezia Borgia (The Borgias).

Future filmmakers, take notes from Seasons 1 & 2 of Stars’ Outlander please, both in its depictions of consensual and non-consensual sex. Both, IMO, were excellently done.

My Deutragonist

I asked my writing partner her opinion on this question and the first thing she said was, “Jaspher.” When I asked her to elaborate as I didn’t quite understand, she answered:

“A lot of his appeal comes from how clear it is that he means no harm from his thought process. Take that away and you’ve only got his acts.”

Jaspher CarsonJaspher is a conflicted soul; an undiagnosed melancholic who spends an awful lot of time in his head, turning over endless “what if” scenarios and rationalising them away in his head. He is constantly putting others before himself, including my protagonist, Melora, whom he is helplessly in love with. He puts an enormous amount of pressure on himself to keep his family afloat, and would sooner work himself to an early grave than admit he needs help.

He’s a good man, with the very best and most honourable of intentions. Every choice he makes is clearly driven — in the text — by factors listed above, but he makes mistakes along the way.

And when I say mistakes, I mean serious mistakes.

Big Mistakes.

HUGE.

Without being privy to any of Jaspher’s internal monologue, the audience might perceive Jaspher to be something he isn’t: purposefully controlling, abusive and cowardly. It’s pretty clear from the text that it’s not as black and white as that, but a film might struggle to convey such a thing.

S.E. Berrow

Phantoms, Dollhouses and Easter Wishes

Happy Easter, everyone! I hope you’re all having a lovely long weekend. For those of you who are working over the Easter Holidays, I will keep you in my thoughts! ♥

No writing challenge answers this week. Today’s blog post consists of Important Life Updates:

I’ve moved house!

Yes, it’s true. I’ve temporarily moved back in with my parents whilst I wait for the sale of my boyfriend’s flat to go through. I can’t say how long I’ll be here for, but I’ve been made to feel very welcome and today was the first day since Tuesday (the day I moved out) that I’ve actually begun to feel truly settled. Throughout the whole of March I’ve essentially been AN ENORMOUS BALL OF STRESS and I can only apologise to all who encountered me during that time and had to put up with me and my madness.Sarah Andersen

I’m glad it’s over now and can get stuck back into the thing I love to do most…

Writing

For those who’ve been following my blog for a while, you’ll know I’m massively behind with the deadline for finishing my WIP, The Mayor. I originally intended to finish Draft One by the end of December, but had to push the deadline back until the end of February for the sake of my mental health (see here). That revised deadline went completely out the window when I started going through the process of selling my home, plus I began having serious self-doubt along with Anxiety-triggering frustration over my complete inability to finish my manuscript. Going on a really nice holiday for two weeks at the beginning of March helped me out a lot; I didn’t touch my manuscript once the whole time I was gone, and when I came back I felt refreshed and excited, ready to finish everything off. I had a really productive week in the middle of March playing around with my deliciously cruel penultimate chapter… only for reality to set back in that I needed to start packing, stat.

Basically, March was a complete write-off as far as writing was concerned, but April is a new month, a new start. I’m in a new place where I have fewer responsibilities to shoulder all by myself (house maintenance, cooking, cleaning etc.), plus I’m genuinely excited to get to grips with the last two chapters and very short epilogue. Wish me luck.

Once I’m finished (please, God, let it be soon), I’m going to take a break — maybe write a novella about my character Jonathan Carson — whilst K.F. Goodacre takes to my work with razor-sharp scalpel and hammers my words into some semblance of a manageable pile.

Dollies!

Speaking of K.F. Goodacre, it seems her talents know no bounds! As a belated birthday present, she very kindly made me my protagonist Melora in doll form… Behold! She is exquisite:

Melora joins another doll made for me by K.F. Goodacre — my character Jonathan Carson. Don’t they look great together? I’m so in love. Raise your hand if you think Kim needs to start her own Etsy account making dolls of other people’s characters for money? *Hand shoots up*. Thank you so much, Parabatai! ♥

Note: The John doll is a couple of years old now. The character’s ethnicity has changed since its creation and as such, his skin should actually be much darker than what’s shown here. Kim’s assured me she will, at some point, flay John’s skin off and replace it with something more fitting. He’s got to match his brother Jaspher, after all. Watch this space…

Lastly…

Kamelot‘s new album The Shadow Theory is out next week. OMG. I’m so, so, so EXCITED!!!!!!!!!!!! Especially since they dropped their (brilliant) new single last Friday entitled ‘The Phantom Divine (Shadow Empire)’, featuring Lauren Hart from melodic death metal band, Once Human. CHECK. IT. OWT:

 

Can’t wait. Simply can’t, can’t wait. Will explode from teh squee. Super excite! BRING ON LONDON IN OCTOBER ♥

That’s all for now. Ta-ta!

S.E. Berrow

#AcresOfInk Writing Challenge ~ Week 12: Questions 11 & 12

Blow me down, I’m all caught up! Don’t get used to it. I’m moving house next week (eek!).

Part of the 52 Week Writing Challenge. Click here to view all questions.

11. Your favourite minor character

I spoke briefly about my true favourite minor character — Ada Lillith — in week 5, question 4 (click here). Today however, so as not to repeat myself,  I’m going to talk to you about Roger Bellamy instead.

Bellamy is a Judicial Officer working for the Town Magistrate, Renwick Jarvis. Described as having a “pinched, pockmarked face” with “beady-black eyes” and a “mirthless smile”, he can often be found sneering and smirking his way through some of The Mayor‘s legal scenes, making life thoroughly unpleasant and unnecessarily difficult for everyone else:

 

“Really, Mr Bellamy,” [Jaspher] said, placing the armadillo down in what he deemed a relatively safe spot; a bureau the officer had already searched. “I’m sure the Magistrate requires you to be thorough, but is it really necessary for you to ransack my office?”

“What’s going on?”

Jaspher turned to find Melora stood in the doorway, pale as a sheet, eyes wide as she absorbed the chaos in front of her.

“Nothing to concern yourself with, young lady.” Bellamy rattled the drawers of Jaspher’s desk, finding them locked. “You got another key for this, Master Carson? None of the ones I have here seem to fit.”

“This young lady is Miss Melora Winship to you, Sir,” said Jaspher feeling his face grow hot. “Mr Winship’s daughter. You should treat her with more respect.”

“I don’t care if she’s the bleeding Duchess of Waite,” said Bellamy, rolling his eyes. “Did you not hear what I just said? Open this drawer, Master Carson, or I’ll be forced to break it open.”

Copyright © S.E. Berrow 2018

BeadleBellamy was most likely drawn to law enforcement because of the sense of power it gives him. He enjoys his ability to inflict state-sanctioned misery on others, and because he’s quite young — I personally imagine him to be in his late teens — he’s a bit self-conscious about his ability to command authority. He gets a kick out of domineering and humiliating others who are much older/more experienced than him.

Let’s be honest; we’ve all met and/or worked with someone like Bellamy in our life. He’s not my favourite minor character because of who he is as a person, but because he’s enormous fun to write with. He’s one of those characters I made up on the spot but found myself constantly referring back to to serve a particular purpose (law enforcement). He also tends to elicit extreme, outraged responses from my Beta readers. As a writer who simply loves creating misery amongst her readership, I absolutely lap this up:

  • “UGH, Bellamy.” – Oran Bailey, said 3 times over the course of a single feedback email.
  • “Hit him, John. HIT HIM.” – also Oran…
  • “”When [Bellamy] smiled at him with narrowed eyes, Jaspher felt his fists unwittingly clench.” Same, Jas. Same.” – Oran really hates Bellamy, OK?
  • “Officious twerp.” – Kim Goodacre.
  • “Arsehole.” – Cassandra Beckley.

Thus, Bellamy is my favourite minor character… after the wonderful Miss Lillith of course.

12. Language: Why a character speaks the way they do / unique slang

As far as creating fantasy languages are concerned, I’m about as far from J.R.R. Tolkein as you could possibly imagine. I’d much prefer to write something vague like, “the merchants began arguing in furious Dontaran” as opposed to spelling out actual words, because then I sound less like a linguistically-challenged fool.

Kintaro

I may, where appropriate, include a smattering of the Kintaronese language in the text as my characters travel further up the map, encountering more and more people from that area. Kintaronese typically consists of hard ‘cuh’ sounds combined with soft ‘ma’ and ‘shh’ sounds e.g. “hakirsh” means “hello” (which shortens to “hash” for ‘hi’), “pir” means “bread” (specifically a loaf), “maru” means “ship”… and so on and so forth.

I have yet to even think about what the language of Dontaro sounds like, so I guess I’ll get back to you on that one.

As for why a particular character speaks the way they do…

Technically speaking, although I write in English (I’m from South-East London), my characters are actually speaking a language called Swordish, native to the Kingdom of Sword. I’m not a fan of writing out accents (think Joseph in Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights; I think this can come across as offensive as it implies the character isn’t speaking ‘normally’), but I do actively try and put inflections on the way characters speak or choose certain words in order to convey an idea of how they sound.

Mayor Roper and Melora’s father Craven — in my head — both have an extremely ‘plummy’ accents. This is because they hail from the educated upper classes; the Swordish equivalent of RP English. I refrain from using contractions when writing with these two and occasionally use old-fashioned exclamations if I want to lay it on thick such as “jolly good”, “I say”, “splendid” etc. It’s worth noting William Kale also speaks with this accent, though he will occasionally slip…

The Carsons meanwhile are very much lower-middle class, so their accents are closer to the Swordish equivalent of Estuary English. As mentioned last week, John and Jaspher’s father Jeremiah was originally a sailor who married into a wealthy family, so he had to change the way he spoke in order to be taken more seriously (get a drink inside him and his accent immediately starts to broaden).

Jonathan CarsonJohn is probably my most interesting character in terms of language and speech patterns. Raised a gentlemen, but working as a sailor, his accent is very much on the lower-end of the ‘Estuary’ spectrum. It’s not quite Cockney (that’s the reserve of working-class characters like Liz e.g. “That was a nice thing what you did, even if it don’t change nothing”) but close enough that he’s sometimes looked down on for the way he speaks. He’s instantly marked out as ‘lesser’ by New Hardway’s elite (the clientele of his father’s shipbuilding firm), whilst simultaneously being mocked for being too ‘posh’ by his peers. As such, he doesn’t really fit in anywhere; it’s something he’s painfully aware of.

I probably work the hardest on John’s speech patterns because they’re the most fun to play with, making heavy use of contractions and 18th century thieves cant. He’ll slide instantly from being devastatingly articulate (“It’s a wonder you’re able to sit so straight when I’ve yet to see any evidence you possess a spine”) to colourful, brazen and broad by the end of the scene (“Vapouring, swaggering spineless fucking bastard!”).

John’s accent rubs off on Melora too. She’s much, much freer with her speech when she’s hanging around John than she is with her father or Jaspher.

S.E. Berrow